8th Grade Visits Museum of Tolerance

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8th Grade Visits Museum of Tolerance

Ryan Lemons, center, reads Holocaust survivor quotes at the Museum of Tolerance.

Ryan Lemons, center, reads Holocaust survivor quotes at the Museum of Tolerance.

Mrs. Palucki

Ryan Lemons, center, reads Holocaust survivor quotes at the Museum of Tolerance.

Mrs. Palucki

Mrs. Palucki

Ryan Lemons, center, reads Holocaust survivor quotes at the Museum of Tolerance.

Logan McDonald and Drew Nagler

On February 24, McPherson 8th graders went to the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles.. The Museum of Tolerance is a unique museum where students learned about Anne Frank, the Holocaust, and social justice. The Holocaust was an event during World War II where the leader of Germany,  Adolf Hitler, committed genocide to try to get rid of Jewish people along with other people he thought inferior.

8th grade learned how he rose to power and destroyed so many people’s lives. The Nazis thought that the Jews were to blame for Germany’s problems and sought to eradicate them. Numbers vary, but most historians agree that over 6 million Jews were killed between 1933-1945.

One of the highlights of the trip was students were able to meet a Holocaust survivor, Amron Dutch, who talked about his experience. He was forced to leave his house and go onto a train that he said were boxes with no windows or anything and a huge amount of people crowded in there. The train was bound for the Auschwitz Concentration Camp, one of the worst concentration camps known to the war. Auschwitz was used mostly during the end of the war when the Nazis were losing. They sent most of the Jews to Auschwitz to be exterminated.  When he got off the train he said that he heard dogs barking and thought he was at a farm and that people would give him food. Instead, he stepped outside to a blinding light and was sent to work. Mr. Dutch worked in the concentration camp until he was rescued by Allied Forces.

Madison Carmona, an 8th grader, explained how she felt about the trip. She said “The trip was interesting but was very sad and scary,” said Madison Carmona.

“I agree with Madison. It was interesting to see what happened back then”, said Juliet Alred.

Drew and I both went on this field trip to the Museum of Tolerance. In our opinion, the museum was very informational and taught us more than what we learned in class as we read “The Diary of Anne Frank” and learn about her world. They had replicated things from the camps and other things that were apart of this horrid event. They also had films of this event. But the school was blessed to be able to see one of the few survivors left from this event. He was very good in expressing his feelings and we were surprised that he didn’t break down crying from this as many students did. He explained that all the survivors are ready to go to heaven and they want to tell as many people as they could before they go.

The museum was a very good learning experience for people to learn about this event. It would be good for everyone to experience this museum because there are only a few survivors left and it was important to listen to these people tell their stories. McPherson 8th graders go on this trip each year because it was a very good eye-opener to what really happened.